Artist Statement

Being a collector makes me a harder self-critic. When I’m actively creating artwork, I feel challenged.  I enjoy the process - sometimes more than the outcome.

Venice in the rain.

Although I have been creating art and making “things” since I was 5, I still have a hard time calling myself an artist. I do not work on my art everyday because I travel extensively, and often, when not traveling, I am working on someone else’s projects.  The art of giving is something I really enjoy, whether it is coming up with alternative income streams for artists, or curating group shows. I also love buying art. Being an art collector definitely influences the way I feel when I create my own work.  Usually with self-talk that starts off with “why are you doing this?  No one is going to see it, and it will only add to a landfill.”  Being a collector makes me a harder self-critic. When I’m actively creating artwork, I feel challenged.  I enjoy the process -sometimes more than the outcome. When working in my studio I always listen to music. I have a system -  I put a CD on repeat, and when I am conscious of what I am listening to, I know it’s time to stop and take a break. 

 I create contemporary artwork in various mediums, from drawing to painting, found object assemblage, to my new fascination with puppetry. What matters the most to me though, is creating art with a message, and making some kind of statement about current events or social causes. I hope some day I can create art that is as powerful as my favorite artist, Judith Mason. Her work has had a profound impact on me, and affects me on an almost daily basis.  Her piece The Man Who Sang and the Woman Who Kept Silent (triptych) is the most powerful artwork I have ever seen.  That work is in the Constitutional Court Art Collection in South Africa. http://ccac.org.za/judith-mason-the-man-who-sang-and-the-woman-who-kept-silent-1998-0003/  Once you read  the description, whenever you see a plastic bag, you will remember this work and what it means.  I was fortunate to see the work in person in 2010 and, to this day, it still has an overwhelming effect on me. I hope someday I can create work that elicits the same kind of social or emotional impact. Then, I will feel like I am finally the artist I was meant to be.